Anna Torma: Primitive Stitch Work that Tells a Story

As a librarian who likes fiber art, enjoys stitch work and buys fiber art books for the Central Library Art collection, I’m always looking for new fiber artists. While researching I came across this artist, Anna Torma.

She blends together her love of primitive art and children’s storytelling together to create these colorful works.  Her work is so energetic and happy. They almost look like children’s drawings. Her colors are vibrant. While reading about her I leaned she does indeed  use the drawings and stories of her children to create many of her works.

Torma was born in 1952, Tarnaors, Hungary. She leaned how to sew, knit, crochet, and embroider from her mother and grandmothers. Her interest in working with textiles goes back to early childhood when she learned to sew, knit, crochet and embroider from her mother and grandmothers. Torma graduated with a degree in Textile Art and Design from the Hungarian University of Applied Arts, Budapest, Hungary, where she studied from 1974-79. Since then she has been exhibiting her large scale hand embroidered wall hangings.


Let’s hope she publishes a book of her work. Until then you can view her new work called Bagatelles here at Selvedge Magazine.

More of Anna’s work.

Until we see a book of her book you can come into the Art Division and explore the 746 Dewey number for Fiber Art. We are always getting new books and you never know what you may find.

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Magazines and Journals

The Central Library subscribes to hundreds of magazines and journals.  Current issues are shelved in the subject departments;  older issues (some going back to the nineteenth century) are kept in storage, where they are easily retrieved when requested.  Most of our magazines don’t leave the building, so the issue you need should always be here.

Click here to see a listing of the magazines in the Arts, Music and Recreation Department.

Popular titles such as  Sports Illustrated, Rolling Stone, Better Homes and Gardens,  and Bride’s are here, but we also have some titles that might be a surprise.

Here are some glimpses of recent issues, plus a gem from the vaults.

Artforum, January 2012. “Dark Matter” article about Chinese artist Liu Wei.

Guitar Player, April 2012. Find out what Fender Machetes and Badcat Bobcats are and why they are some of the best guitar gear of 2012.

Antiques Roadshow Insider, April 2012. Features an article on collectible comic books.

Outside, April 2012. The “wanderlist” includes a visit to Sweden’s treehotel.

Vogue January 15, 1914 featured “The latest refinements of the motor car- the liveries and duties of the chauffeur.”
Vogue January 2012 features actress Meryl Streep.

Art, Music and Recreation Division Magazines

Arts, Music and Recreation Division Magazines

Afterimage
Amazing Spider Man
American Art Review
American Artist
American Cinematographer
American Craft
American PhilatelistAmerican Photo
American Record Guide
Antique Trader Weekly
Antiques Antiques and Collecting Magazine
Antiques Roadshow Insider
Aperture
Apollo
Architect
Architectural Digest
Architectural Record
Architectural Review
Art & Antiques
Art Doll QuarterlyArt EducationArt in America
Artforum InternationalArt Libraries Journal
Artists Magazine
ArtnewsArts Education Policy Review
Back Stage
Backpacker
Baseball Digest
Batman Comics
BeadworkBelle Armoire Jewelry (coming soon)
Better Homes and Gardens
Bicycling
Billboard
Billboard International Buyers Guide
Billboard International Talent & Touring Guide
Black Belt
Blind Spot
Blues Revue
Bowlers Journal International
Brides
Bridge World
Call Sheet by Back Stage
Camera Obscura
Camping Life
Canoe & Kayak MagazineCast On
Ceramics Monthly
Chess Life
Clavier Companion
Climbing Coach and Athletic Director
Coin World
Communications Arts
Country Living
Crafts Report
Crafts n Things
Crochet World
Dance Magazine
Diapson
Digital PhotoDigital Video
Down Beat
Dwell Magazine
Entertainment Weekly
Espn Magazine
Fanfare
Field & Stream
Film Comment
Film Journal Intl
Film Quarterly
Foxfire Magazine
Goldmine
Golf Digest
GQ
GramophoneGuitar Player Hockey News
House Beautiful
Instrumentalist
Interior Design
International MusicianInt’l Review of African American Art
Interview
Journal of the Soc. of Architectural Historians Keyboard
Lakeland Boating
Landscape Architecture
Linns Stamp News Special
Live Design
Living BluesM Music and Musicians
Mekeels and Stamps Magazine
Museum of American Folk ArtMusic Educators Journal
New Musical Express
Numismatist
Official Museum Directory
Old-House Journal
Opera News
Outdoor Life
Outside
Paper Crafts
Petersen’s Hunting
Piecework
Popular Photography
Print – Americas Graphics
Professional ArtistQuilting ArtsRaw Vision
Ring
Rolling Stone
Runners World
SailSchool Arts
Sculpture Review
Sheet Music MagazineShuttle, Spindle and Dye Pot
Sight and Sound
Sing Out
Skating
Ski
Soccer America
SonglinesSouthwest Art
Sporting News
Sports Afield
Sports Illustrated
Stained Glass Studio
Sunshine Artist
Superman
Swimming World Magazine
Tennis
Town & Country
Track & Field News Treasures
TV Guide
Variety
Victorian Homes VM+SD (Visual Merchandising + Store Design)
Vogue
Yachting

Barn Quilts

If you have been driving the rural routes around Kendall or Le Roy, NY, you may have noticed  large, colorful quilt blocks painted on the sides of barns.  They are part of a popular art movement known as the American Quilt Trail.  Local barn quilt painters are inspired by beloved family quilts, the beauty of bold traditional designs, or quirky names of patterns such as “Drunkard’s Path” or “Hole in the Barn Door.”
(Click on images below to link to library holdings information)
 
The story of the American Quilt Trail, featuring the colorful patterns of quilt squares writ large on barns throughout North America, is the story of one of the fastest-growing grassroots public arts movements in the United States and Canada. In Barn Quilts and the American Quilt Trail Movement Suzi Parron travels through twenty-nine states and two Canadian provinces to visit the people and places that have put this movement on America’s tourist and folk art map.Through dozens of interviews with barn artists, committee members, and barn owners Parron documents a journey that began in 2001 with the founder of the movement, Donna Sue Groves. Groves’s desire to honor her mother with a quilt square painted on their barn became a group effort that eventually grew into a county-wide project. Today, registered quilt squares form a long imaginary clothesline, appearing on more than three thousand barns scattered along one hundred driving trails.With more than fifty full-color photographs, Parron documents a movement that combines rural economic development with an American folk art phenomenon.
 
 You may find yourself inspired to paint your own “Barn Quilt” or perhaps sew an actual fabric quilt.   The Central Library’s Art Division has hundreds of books to get you started and to fire your imagination.
 
 
There are quilting DVDs available, as well…check them out!