Mother Eagle: Sublime Embroidery in Miniature

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Should you doubt your embroidery and stitching skills, Mother Eagle embroidery isn’t the place you should be looking at to make you feel better. A woman named Katie, a UK artist, is the person behind Mother Eagle, she does lovely fine hand embroidery in miniature. She fifth generation needleworker, a skill she learned from her mother as a child. Each work is something to behold.

You won’t find the usual with Mother Eagle, instead you will find forest creatures, anatomy like hearts, and rib cages, skulls, and octopi. Mother Eagle designs and creates her miniature embroidery patterns, some are smaller than 1mm. She creates these small embroideries for many of the pretty pendants she makes. Each one of her pieces takes hours of work and because her stitches are so small she uses magnifying glasses while working on a piece. Her work is so lovely, they are destined to become heirlooms.

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In this interview she did with Feeling Stitchy, Mother Eagle talks about the fabric she uses. She has been lucky enough to have inherited some pretty antique fabrics that are trimmed in lace. For those of us not lucky enough to have these antique pieces we can use old pillowcases like she uses and then she dyes them in black tea.

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I would love to see her moths embroidered onto a Mister Finch moth, another incredible UK fiber artist!

Click ribcage to see more of her images

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More images and an interview here.

Mother Eagle’s Facebook page and some flickr images.

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And if her beautiful work is not enough, Mother Eagle is a cat lover and H.P. Lovecraft fan!

All images used by Mother Eagle’s permission.

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Anna Torma: Primitive Stitch Work that Tells a Story

As a librarian who likes fiber art, enjoys stitch work and buys fiber art books for the Central Library Art collection, I’m always looking for new fiber artists. While researching I came across this artist, Anna Torma.

She blends together her love of primitive art and children’s storytelling together to create these colorful works.  Her work is so energetic and happy. They almost look like children’s drawings. Her colors are vibrant. While reading about her I leaned she does indeed  use the drawings and stories of her children to create many of her works.

Torma was born in 1952, Tarnaors, Hungary. She leaned how to sew, knit, crochet, and embroider from her mother and grandmothers. Her interest in working with textiles goes back to early childhood when she learned to sew, knit, crochet and embroider from her mother and grandmothers. Torma graduated with a degree in Textile Art and Design from the Hungarian University of Applied Arts, Budapest, Hungary, where she studied from 1974-79. Since then she has been exhibiting her large scale hand embroidered wall hangings.


Let’s hope she publishes a book of her work. Until then you can view her new work called Bagatelles here at Selvedge Magazine.

More of Anna’s work.

Until we see a book of her book you can come into the Art Division and explore the 746 Dewey number for Fiber Art. We are always getting new books and you never know what you may find.