Caution! Artist @ Work! 2013-14 Season Line-up

It’s back! The Arts Division of the Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County will feature a different artist once a month with its Caution! Artists at Work! 2013-2014 program series. We will host a different local artist or musician who will be working on a piece right in the Arts Division. Patrons are welcome to stop by and observe an artist painting or listen to a musician playing. These programs happen on the third Saturday of each month from 1-3 PM in the afternoon on the second floor of the Bausch & Lomb Library building. We look forward to seeing there!

We hope you will stop by and see our local talent at work! Call 428-8140 for more details.

Woodcut artist Heather Swenson demonstrates her technique for Rochester Public Library patrons. Photo credit: Judith Schewe. Caution! Artist @ Work! was also featured on the Library As Incubator Blog!

Here is this year’s line-up…

September 21Alicia Fink, precious metal clay jewelry artist. Metal Clay (PMC) is a product from Japan.  It consists of microscopic particles of silver or gold suspended in an organic binder to create a pliable material with a consistency similar to modeling clay.  Alicia has been certified by the Precious Metal Clay Guild and by PMC Connection and has taken workshops under Celie Fago, an outstanding Senior Teacher for the PMC Guild.  She teaches PMC jewelry making in the area Continuing Education Programs, at the Rochester Memorial Art Gallery and at her studio.

October 19 –  Paula Marra, felted animals and creatures. Paula, of Queen Mab Fairy Houses fame, returns to the Central Library this fall to demonstrate the wildly popular craft of felting.

November 16Sandra Kemp, gourd artist. Sandra Kemp’s beautiful gourds have been displayed in the Eileen Reidman Display Cases in the Art’s Division. She will demonstrate her unique gourd artistry this fall.

December 21Karen Barber and Linda Taggart, hammered dulcimers. Karen and Linda are members of Striking Strings Hammered Dulcimer Ensemble directed by Mitzie Collins.

January 18 – Mary Housel-Demanchik, painter and book artist. Mary is an Art teacher at Rush-Henrietta Middle School and Adjunct Professor at Nazareth College. Mary’s artist’s books have been featured in the Central Library’s 2011 and 2012 Art of the Book exhibits.

February 15Randy Pollok, Rochester Ukulele Support Group. The Rochester Ukulele Support Group (RUSG) meets on the first Thursday of every month. They learn tunes, new techniques and share info about the world of ukulele. Randy and friends will be on hand for ukulele fun!

March 15Mia Sohn, decorative Ukrainian eggs. This art form is based on a 5,000 year-old tradition. It is a wax resist process on actual eggshells. This art form is known as ‘pysanka,’ which is a Ukrainian word meaning ‘to write.’

April 19 – Kathleen Barry-Wagner, landscape painter. Barry-Wagner is a Rochester area artist associated with the Outside the Box Art gallery and part-time art teacher who will be doing a demo of how to paint a landscape. She will be available to talk about use of color and  perspective and looks forward to answering any questions you may have about painting in general.

May 17Nancy Valle, ceramist. Ms. Valle’s work has been featured at the Memorial Art Gallery in Rochester. Her ceramic studio is located on the top floor of a former shoe factory that flourished in the early days of Rochester. Nancy also offers clay workshops in her Rochester studio.

JAM: Jazz Appreciation Month

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You don’t have to wait for the Xerox Rochester Jazz Festival to celebrate your love of this music. April is Jazz Appreciation Month. Every April, Jazz Appreciation Month (JAM) highlights the glories of jazz as both a historical and a living treasure. Here is one special month to draw greater public attention to the extraordinary heritage and history of jazz and its importance to American culture. Musicians, concert halls, schools, colleges , museums, libraries and public broadcasters are encouraged to offer special programs during this month. The Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History (which operates the world’s most comprehensive set of jazz programs) leads this initiative in concert with a distinguished roster of federal agencies, nongovernmental organizations and broadcasting networks.

The Arts, Music, & Recreation Division has an extensive collection of Jazz recordings and books documenting the history of Jazz and Jazz musicians. Jazz lovers can also celebrate with Jazz Rochester.

 

 

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SXSW March 8-March 17 2013 Music and Film

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Who is at SXSW 2013. Facebook site . Film.
Schedule

Depech Mode to play on March 15.

Stream it live.

NPR:  SXSW 2013 Music Preview

The Foo Fighters frontman is also the key-note speaker at this year’s event and will bring Stevie Nicks, John Fogerty, Rick Springfield, Corey Taylor, Alain Johannes, Rage Against the Machine’s Brad Wilk and Fear’s Lee Ving to play live according to Billboard. His talk will take place on March 14, 2013 at the Austin Convention Centre.

Additionally, other new names confirmed for the festival include Iggy and the Stooges, Kendrick Lamar, Iron & Wine, Devendra Banhart, Tenacious D, Ghostface Killah, Pusha T, Big KRIT, Youth Lagoon, Mikal Cronin, Reggie Watts, Matthew E. White, FIDLAR, Rustie, Trash Talk, Parquet Courts, A Place to Bury Strangers, Ab-Soul, Diamond Rugs, Kids These Days, Nobunny and White Mystery.

SXSW 2013 previously announced names including Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, Vampire Weekend, The Flaming Lips, Earl Sweatshirt, Black Lips, Wild Belle, METZ, Toro Y Moi and Unknown Mortal Orchestra for this year’s festival.

Some of the much anticipated acts who will join Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds on Wednesday, March 13 for the NPR Music showcase at Stubb’s. Yeah Yeah Yeahs will be making a stop to perform in support of their new upcoming album, Mosquito. They’ve already released the crazy cool cover art and a teaser video. Check it out on their site. And see them live at SXSW Music 2013!

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Alan Lomax’s Folk Music Journey

Alan Lomax was one of the great American field collectors of folk music of the 20th century. He was also an ethnomusicologist, folklorist, archivist, writer, scholar, political activist, oral historian, and film-maker. Several books and recordings have been created to tell the story of his life’s work.

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More than fifty years ago, on a trip dubbed “the Southern Journey,” Alan Lomax visited Virginia, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Kentucky, and Tennessee, uncovering the little-known southern back-country and blues music that we now consider uniquely American. Lomax’s camera was a constant companion, and his images of both legendary and anonymous folk musicians complement his famous field recordings.

These photographs-largely unpublished-show musicians making music with family and friends at home, with fellow worshippers at church, and alongside workers and prisoners in the fields. Discussions of Lomax’s life and career by his disciple and lauded folklorist William Ferris, and a lyrical look at Lomax’s photographs by novelist and Grammy Award-winning music writer Tom Piazza, enrich this valuable collection. CD included.

From the Alan Lomax Video Archive

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Folklorist, archivist, anthropologist, singer, political activist, talent scout, ethnomusicologist, filmmaker, concert and record producer, Alan Lomax is best remembered as the man who introduced folk music to the masses. Lomax began his career making field recordings of rural music for the Library of Congress and by the late 1930s brought his discoveries to radio, including Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, and Burl Ives. By the 1940s he was producing concerts that brought white and black performers together, and in the 1950s he set out to record the whole world.

Lomax was also a controversial figure. When he worked for the U. S. government he was tracked by the FBI, and when he worked in Britain, MI5 continued the surveillance. In his last years he turned to digital media and developed technology that anticipated today’s breakthroughs. Featuring a cast of characters including Eleanor Roosevelt, Leadbelly, Carl Sandburg, Carl Sagan, Jelly Roll Morton, Muddy Waters, and Bob Dylan, Szwed’s fascinating biography memorably captures Lomax and provides a definitive account of an era as seen through the life of one extraordinary man.

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This history of folk music looks at musicians, collectors and other figures from around the world. The book presents an overview of international folk roots and shows the contributions of the artists and the evolution of folk music as a force for political and social change. Profiles of Pete Seeger, Burl Ives, Woody Guthrie and others show how the stage was set for the American folk revival of the 1960s.

“Alan Lomax perfected the role of musicologist and it is the blueprint he set down which all others have followed. He had an unbridled enthusiams for his work, as well as a spirit that separated him from others, including his father. The folklore revivalist was instrumental in preserving the history of music on a global level.”-David Dicaire

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Concert flyer (Alan Lomax, Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger), late 1940’s.

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Each of the major areas of music that Alan Lomax researched is documented on the very, very large Alan Lomax Collection series on Rounder. This sampler album has a short introduction to Lomax’s philosophy as he conveyed it to Charles Kuralt before his death. Read more at allmusic.com

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From 1933-1985, Alan Lomax (along with his father, John A. Lomax) gathered field-recorded examples of African-American song forms, most of which ended up in the expansive Library of Congress American folk music collection. Read more at allmusic.com

~JS MusicLibrarian@Central