Mother Eagle: Sublime Embroidery in Miniature

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Should you doubt your embroidery and stitching skills, Mother Eagle embroidery isn’t the place you should be looking at to make you feel better. A woman named Katie, a UK artist, is the person behind Mother Eagle, she does lovely fine hand embroidery in miniature. She fifth generation needleworker, a skill she learned from her mother as a child. Each work is something to behold.

You won’t find the usual with Mother Eagle, instead you will find forest creatures, anatomy like hearts, and rib cages, skulls, and octopi. Mother Eagle designs and creates her miniature embroidery patterns, some are smaller than 1mm. She creates these small embroideries for many of the pretty pendants she makes. Each one of her pieces takes hours of work and because her stitches are so small she uses magnifying glasses while working on a piece. Her work is so lovely, they are destined to become heirlooms.

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In this interview she did with Feeling Stitchy, Mother Eagle talks about the fabric she uses. She has been lucky enough to have inherited some pretty antique fabrics that are trimmed in lace. For those of us not lucky enough to have these antique pieces we can use old pillowcases like she uses and then she dyes them in black tea.

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I would love to see her moths embroidered onto a Mister Finch moth, another incredible UK fiber artist!

Click ribcage to see more of her images

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More images and an interview here.

Mother Eagle’s Facebook page and some flickr images.

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And if her beautiful work is not enough, Mother Eagle is a cat lover and H.P. Lovecraft fan!

All images used by Mother Eagle’s permission.

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Expired Library Books

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We see many torn, shredded damaged books here at Central. Some fall apart on their own and others get damaged accidentally. Photographer, Kerry Mansfield, who claims not to be a a big reader, has photographed some of these discarded items that she buys from from other libraries. She may not be a big reader but she finds the molded and damaged book to be of interest enough to photograph it. Her photographs turn the abandoned book into an artifact complete with mold, mildew, tears, margin scribbles or broken bindings. The New York Times’ Lens Blog, has a slide show where you can view her photographs.

She started out photographing children’s books and books for teens, such as the well known Dr. Seuss book, “Hop on Pop,” and obscure ones like Evelyn Sibley Lampman’s “The Shy Stegosaurus of Cricket Creek.” She then turned her camera to books for adults like  Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird.” You see them on the Lens Blog.

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Fashion: From Jazz to Vogue’s Eye

Two new fashion books have arrived in the Art Division. One covers the glamorous world of 1920s fashion and the other celebrates the role the fashion editor has played at Vogue for 120 years.

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Vogue: The Editor’s Eye, retraces the work of Vogue’s legendary fashion editors including Pally Mellen, Babs Simpson, and Grace Coddington. These women collaborated with photographers, designers and stylists to create the fantasy world (for most of us anyway) of fashion. The book focuses on Vogue‘s dazzling archive of images that have had an impact on fashion, music, and culture. This book is lavish in its design and photographs. These editors had and still do have a vision when it comes to presenting the world of high fashion.

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The 1920s was one of the most stylish and influential fashion periods full of feathers, beads, sequins, and anything to over indulge in. After all this was a time of highly decorated Erte dresses and Art Deco.

Dressed to Kill: Jazz Age Fashion, brings us into that legendary elegant world of the 20s. This collection of photographs comes from Virginia, the most fabulous renowned antique clothing store in London. Many stylists, designers, models and museums use this store as their go to place for dresses, coats, and accessories from this time period. All are carefully preserved offering inspiration from this glittering time to all who are looking for the craftsmanship and ornamentation of this important fashion period. This is a lavish book, full of exquisite photographs. Indulge!

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Mid-Century Wallpaper: Neue Dekorationsstoffe Tapeten und Teppiche

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While *weeding in the stacks we often come across items that we call “gems.” Those rare fragile items that either don’t circulate very often or those that are are not in great condition to be checked out.

Decorating (747) is one of the areas I was weeding in and found this great book on Mid-Century wallpaper. Mid-Century modern is an architectural, interior, product and graphic design that describes mid-20th century developments in modern design, architecture, and urban development from roughly 1933 to 1965. It is now recognized by scholars and museums worldwide as a significant design movement.

The book is Neue Dekorationsstoffe Tapeten und Teppiche, that translates to new decorative fabrics wallpapers and carpets. This book contains many images of Mid-Century wallpaper in black and white. The interesting thing about the book is, it contains about 30 full color original wallpaper pattern pieces from that time period, complete with texture.

If you are a lover of Mid-Century modern come take a look at this book. The book is reference and must be used in the library. Click on the cover above to connect with our catalog.

Here are some sample images.

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BiblioPod

Miriam Makeba, nicknamed “Mother Africa” and “The Empress of African Song,” was a South African singer and political activist. Makeba is credited with bringing the rhythmic and spiritual sounds of Africa to the West. Makeba’s social activism and music impressed American Harry Belafonte who served as her mentor and promoter in the United States. In 1968, Makeba married American civil rights activist Stokely Carmichael, which proved a detriment to her career due to Carmichael’s militant “Black Power” stance. Makeba writes about her life in Makeba: My Story which is available at the library. Here are a few songs that reflect the long and diverse career of Miriam Makeba with a mix of multicultural music, pop, blues and jazz.

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Pata Pata/ Miriam Makeba

A surprise Top 20 hit in the autumn of 1967, “Pata Pata” was co-written and cut by Miriam Makeba, who was then married to Afro/jazz/rock pioneer Hugh Masakela…

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BiblioPod

Mona Seghatoleslami joins our team of music advisers. Mona announces classical music on WXXI’s Classical 91.5 weekdays from 2pm-7pm. She’s also the host of the lunchtime concert series Live from Hochstein.

Just in time for Valentine’s Day – here are some classical music listening suggestions connected to tales of ill-fated love.

This list covers all bases. If you’re a romantic, these are sweet, yet tragic tales. If you’re spending Valentine’s Day watching horror movies and thinking about tearing up paper hearts, rejoice: nothing good comes of all this romance in the end.

First, some general considerations:

1)     Pretty much any tale with “and” in the title involves a tragic pair. Romeo and Juliet. Tristan and Isolde. Daphnis and Chloe. Dido and Aeneas. Pelleas and Melisande. Can you think of any exceptions?

2)     A girl coughing in an opera means she’s doomed. This does not stop the tenors from falling…

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