What’s New in Graphic Novels for the start of 2013

Lots of great new additions to our graphic novel collection for the start of the New Year. Here’s what’s new and hot!

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Queer cartooning encompasses some of the best and most interesting comics of the last four decades, with creators tackling complex issues of identity and a changing society with intelligence, humor and imagination. This groundbreaking new collection celebrates a vibrant artistic underground by gathering together a collection of excellent stories that can be enjoyed by everyone. Among the stellar list of contributors to No Straight Lines is Alison Bechdel, Howard Cruse, Ralf Koenig, Robert Kirby, Wojnarowicz and Dan Savage.

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When confronted with his girlfriend’s request that they have a child together, Samuel fled that relationship. But now, a year later, when he receives a letter from Alice announcing she is expecting a baby, old emotions flare up and he embarks on a long journey to see Alice again – to re-open or perhaps close forever that important chapter of his life. The Crackle of the Frost is what he sees, hears, experiences and learns during that journey.

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A richly-illustrated graphic novel adaptation of Anne Rice’s Interview with the Vampire, told through the eyes of the vampire Claudia, who was just a little girl when she was turned by the vampire Lestat. Though she spends many years of happiness with her two vampire fathers, she gradually grows discontent with their insistence upon treating her like a little girl, even though she has lived as long as any mortal man…and her lust to kill is certainly no less than theirs…

Gary Panter began imagining Dal Tokyo, a future Mars that is terraformed by Texan and Japanese workers, as far back as 1972, appropriating a friend’s idea about cultural and temporal collision (The Dal is short for Dallas).

Wallace Wood applied his preternaturally lush brushwork to over two dozen stories in the thematically overlapping (“dreadful things happen to people, both innocent and guilty”) horror, crime, and suspense genres. Came the Dawn is the subject of one of the two premiere releases in Fantagraphics’ highly-anticipated new EC reprint line.

The Voyeurs is a real-time memoir of a turbulent five years in the life of renowned cartoonist, diarist, and filmmaker Gabrielle Bell. It collects episodes from her award-winning series Lucky, in which she travels to Tokyo, Paris, the South of France, and all over the United States, but remains anchored by her beloved Brooklyn, where sidekick Tony provides ongoing insight, offbeat humor, and enduring friendship.

The Best American Comics 2012 FEATURING Charles Burns, Chester Brown, Joyce Farmer, Chris Ware, Gary Panter, Sergio Aragonés, Christoph Niemann, Adrian Tomine, Sarah Varon, and others.

From the Underground era to THE SIMPSONS comic book to her graphic novel THE BIG SKINNY, Carol Lay has been writing and drawing amazing stories for years. Her Story Minute strip, which gained a devoted following while appearing on Salon.com, is collected here for the first time in Illiterature.

Andy’s life is going nowhere, fast. He left art school with his career all worked out ahead of time, but … to say it didn’t work out is the understatement of the century. Unemployed and living with his overbearing parents, Andy struggles to keep sight of the lofty goals that once drove him. The first volume of a series, Tune is a science fiction comedy, but it’s also a smart and affectionate examination of human nature.

“Ah Pook” was the legendary unpublished collaboration between Burroughs and McNeil that never fully came together. This book, which only contains the art from McNeil, is part of the planned project in a two-book set.

Building Stories imagines the inhabitants of a three-story Chicago apartment building: a 30-something woman who has yet to find someone with whom to spend the rest of her life; a couple, possibly married, who wonder if they can bear each others company another minute; and the building’s landlady, an elderly woman who has lived alone for decades.

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To lure pretty Epily, little chick Abelard sees only one solution: to catch the moon for her. So off he goes to America, the country that invented flying machines. Armed with his banjo and his proverb-sharing hat, he launches out on the country roads, where he meets Gaston, a grumpy bear with whom he shares his plan. As opposed to dreamer Abelard, Gaston has his feet firmly planted on the ground. This humorous comic, where the absurd becomes poetry, explores philosophical ideas through a simple, fanciful story.

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Scott Campbell’s acclaimed Great Showdowns series, showing strangely good- natured confrontations between his favorite movie characters, finally gets the book collection fans have been demanding!

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It’s all here in the second edition of Faster than a speeding bullet: The rise of the Graphic Novel–the must-reads, the newest, hottest creators, and what to look for in the future of this exciting new medium.

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