What’s New in Graphic Novels

Some new titles available in the Arts Division at Central…

In Fever Moon,we meet the most ancient and deadly Unseelie ever created, the Fear Dorcha. For eons, he’s traveled worlds with the Unseelie king, leaving behind him a path of mutilation and destruction. Now he’s hunting Dublin, and no one Mac loves is safe. Dublin is a war zone. The walls between humans and Fae are down. A third of the world’s population is dead and chaos reigns. Imprisoned over half a million years ago, the Unseelie are free and each one Mac meets is worse than the last. Human weapons don’t stand a chance against them.

 

Detective John Blacksad returns, with a new case that takes him to a 1950s New Orleans filled with hot jazz and cold-blooded murder! Hired to discover the fate of a celebrated pianist, Blacksad finds his most dangerous mystery yet in the midst of drugs, voodoo, the rollicking atmosphere of Mardi Gras, and the dark underbelly that it hides!

Originally serialized in Love and Rockets New Stories, “Ti-Girls Adventures” managed to be both a rollickingly creative super-hero joyride (featuring three separate super-teams and over two dozen characters) that ranged from the other side of the universe to Maggie’s shabby apartment, and a genuinely dramatic fable about madness, grief, and motherhood as Penny Century’s decades-long quest to become a genuine super-heroine are finally, and tragically, fulfilled.

Siegfried, Volume 1 by Alex Alice is the first of a three-part story inspired by Wagner’s classic opera The Ring of the Nibelung. Siegfried, half-god and half-mortal, is a young boy being raised by Mime, one of the last of the dwarf-goblin Nibelungs, in a dark forest with only wolves for friends and family. While his foster parent only wants to live in peace and solitude, Siegfried yearns to discover who his real parents are and live amongst his own kind, not knowing that Odin, father of the Norse gods, has a destiny planned for him: to fight the dragon Fafnir, guardian of the Rheingold.

Part personal history, part biography, Dotter of Her Father”s Eyes contrasts two coming-of-age narratives: that of Lucia, the daughter of James Joyce, and that of author Mary Talbot, daughter of the eminent Joycean scholar James S. Atherton. Social expectations and gender politics, thwarted ambitions and personal tragedy are played out against two contrasting historical backgrounds, poignantly evoked by the atmospheric visual storytelling of award-winning graphic-novel pioneer Bryan Talbot. Produced through an intense collaboration seldom seen between writers and artists, Dotter of Her Father”s Eyes is smart, funny, and sad – an essential addition to the evolving genre of graphic memoir.

This graphic novel showcases Lovecraft’s talent for the macabre. From the insidious mutations of ‘The Shadow Over Innsmouth’ to the mind-bending threat of ‘The Call of Cthulhu’, this collection explores themes of insanity, inherited guilt and arcane ritual to startling effect.

Out of the Shadows collects the best of Golden Age comics artist Mort Meskin’s comic book stories from the ’30s, ’40s, and ’50s. Edited by Meskin biographer Steven Brower, Out of the Shadows continues Fantagraphics’ mission to publish the greatest work by Golden Age comic book artists. For decades Meskin’s comics were relegated to the yellowing newsprint pages of collectors. Now finally Mort Meskin steps “out of the shadows” in the first book dedicated solely to reprinting his best comics stories.

In this new original graphic novel, Batman: Death by Design, from superstar writer/designer Chip Kidd and artist Dave Taylor, Gotham City is undergoing one of the most expansive construction booms in its history. The most prestigious architects from across the globe have buildings in various phases of completion all over town. As chairman of the Gotham Landmarks Commission, Bruce Wayne has been a key part of this boom, which signals a golden age of architectural ingenuity for the city. And then, the explosions begin. All manner of design-related malfunctions–faulty crane calculations, sturdy materials suddenly collapsing, software glitches, walkways giving way and much more–cause casualties across the city. This bizarre string of seemingly random, unconnected catastrophes threaten to bring the whole construction industry down. Fingers are pointed as Batman must somehow solve the problem and find whoever is behind it all. -Amazon

Millions know and love the legends of Jesse James, Annie Oakley, Davy Crockett and others who settled in the Wild West. The stories of frontiersmen, outlaws, cowboys and Indians are indelibly linked to the spirit of America. Golden Age Western Comics presents a collection of these uniquely American stories as told through a uniquely American medium…the comic book! A loving reproduction of full colour, restored, complete scans of over 40 of the best Western stories created between 1948-1956. A collection that is sure to delight fans of all ages.

If you’re visiting the flying city of Amperstam without the latest printing of The Lurker’s Guide, you might as well be lost. This one-sheet is written, edited, and printed by Ashe, a girl raised on the streets of the flying city, and is dedicated to revealing its hidden treasures and deepest secrets—including many that the over controlling government doesn’t want anyone to know. The stakes are raised when Ashe accidentally uncovers the horror of exactly how Amperstam travels among the skies and garners the attention of those who would rather that secret be kept in the hands of the city’s powerful leaders.
Guy Delisle expertly lays the groundwork for a cultural road map of contemporary Jerusalem, utilizing the classic stranger in a strange land point of view that made his other books,Pyongyang, Shenzhen,and Burma Chronicles required reading for understanding what daily life is like in cities few are able to travel to. In Jerusalem: Chronicles from the Holy City, Delisle explores the complexities of a city that represents so much to so many. He eloquently examines the impact of the conflict on the lives of people on both sides of the wall while drolly recounting the quotidian: checkpoints, traffic jams, and holidays.
Comic Books and American Cultural History is an anthology that examines the ways in which comic books can be used to understand the history of the United States. Over the last twenty years, there has been a proliferation of book-length works focusing on the history of comic books, but few of those books have emphasized their connection to American cultural history. These original essays demonstrate the different ways in which comic books can be used as resources. The book is divided into four parts: Part 1 examines comics and graphic novels that demonstrate the techniques of cultural history; the essays in Part 2 use comics and graphic novels as cultural artifacts; the third part of the book studies the concept of historical identity through the 20th century; and the final section focuses on different treatments of contemporary American history. Discussing works that range from Wonder Woman and Superman to American Flagg! and Ex Machina, this is a vivid collection that will be useful to anyone teaching or studying comic books in the classroom.
The Arts Division also subscribes to…

Amazing Spiderman

Batman

Uncanny X-Men

Superman

Look for these titles soon…

Avengers

Darkness

Fantastic Four

Wonder Woman

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